The Word Became Flesh (John 1)

The Word Became Flesh (John 1)

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it…
And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth. (John bore witness about him, and cried out, ‘This was he of whom I said, ‘He who comes after me ranks before me, because he was before me.’) For from his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace. For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. No one has ever seen God; the only God, who is at the Father’s side, he has made him known.”
-John 1:1-5; 14–18

And so we look at today…

The Word Became Flesh

Jesus is reffered to as the “Word” many times in scripture, and they all point to one thing:

Jesus shows us the mind and heart of God.

This of it this way:

How do you find out what someone is thinking?
What someone cares about?
What they’re passionate about?
They tell you.

They speak or write: they communicate in some way.

One of the most amazing things Jesus brought us was revealing God’s mind and heart in physical form.

For years God communicated through prophets, visions and various other ways (and He still does) – but even better, we’re told that we get the benefit of hearing/seening Jesus.

“Long ago, at many times and in many ways, God spoke to our fathers by the prophets, but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things, through whom also he created the world. He is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature, and he upholds the universe by the word of his power…” -Hebrews 1:1–3

Jesus is the exact imprint of The Father’s nature.

That’s incredible to think about.

If you want to know how God thinks: look at Jesus
If you want to know how God responds to different situations: look at Jesus
If you want to see what God values: look at Jesus
If you want to know God: look at Jesus

Jesus even explicitly expressed this during His time on earth:

“So Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, the Son can do nothing of his own accord, but only what he sees the Father doing. For whatever the Father does, that the Son does likewise.” -John 5:19 (John 6:38; 8:28; 12:49)

So, as we look at Jesus this Christmas, let us remember that He’s the perfect representation of God The Father.

And to close this post, I want to share one of my favorite passages of scripture.

In this section, John is laying down some ground rules before continuing to encourage the church to continue loving and following Jesus, to stay far away from sin and ungodliness and to love others with the love that Jesus gave us.

His foundation for this book (1 John) is that he and others actually got to see Jesus. They saw Him, touched Him, heard from Him. Jesus was a physical, real person Who brought emotional and spiritual life to everyone He saw. Jesus was a real person Who brought many literally back to life.

Jesus was really real, and really died, and really rose from the dead and visited hundreds of people at a time so that there would be no doubt that He truly was God and came back to life.

May you trust John’s beautiful testimony and the testimony of many others:

“That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we looked upon and have touched with our hands, concerning the word of life— the life was made manifest, and we have seen it, and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal life, which was with the Father and was made manifest to us— that which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, so that you too may have fellowship with us; and indeed our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ. And we are writing these things so that our joy may be complete.” -1 John 1:1–4

The Light Came Down (John 1)

The Light Came Down (John 1)

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it. There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. He came as a witness, to bear witness about the light, that all might believe through him. He was not the light, but came to bear witness about the light. The true light, which gives light to everyone, was coming into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made through him, yet the world did not know him. He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him. But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God.

– John 1:1–13

And so we look at today…

The Light Came Down

God is described as light or as the One Who brings light many times in scripture. There’s many ways we can apply this to our lives such as the light that guides us, the light that exposes us and our sin completely to Him, or the light that shows His perfection and holiness.

But there’s another aspect this verse reminds us:

The Light Of Hope

Have you ever heard of the phrase “there’s light at the end of the tunnel” or “it’s darkest before the dawn”?

This light, after a period of darkness,
is a sign of change.
Of new beginnings.
Of hope.

Paul reminds us that Jesus brought us hope in the letter to the Ephesus church…

“Remember that you were at that time separated from Christ, alienated from the commonwealth of Israel and strangers to the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world.” -Ephesians 2:12

In the midst of a dark world,
The Light (God, Himself)
Came down to offer light to everyone.

And now, we’re called to bring that light to others…

“You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.” -Matthew 5:14–16

Now, lest we think to highly of ourselves.
This light is not our own.

We’re told in countless other scriptures that it’s God’s Spirit, His empowerment, His life and His light that is now inside of us to share with others.

In our own strength,
We have nothing to offer,
But we can offer God’s light and His strength to everyone we come accross.

Paul describes it this way:

“But we have this treasure in jars of clay, to show that the surpassing power belongs to God and not to us.” -2 Corinthians 4:7

We are merely “jars of clay”
But inside of us is the Glory, Power and Light of God that is given freely to all who receieve it through His Gospel and Grace.

So, may you not hide God’s light as you go through this Christmas season.

His light is free to all,
but remember that not all will accept it.

It’s not our job to convince people
or to argue with them,
but merely to offer.

To shine God’s light and life in our lives
and to tell people where they can receive God’s light too.

King Forever (Isaiah 9:6)

King Forever (Isaiah 9:6)

“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end, on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this.”

– Isaiah 9:6-7

And so we look at today…

King Forever

The final part to this Isaiah 9:6-7 section is that the Messiah’s Kingdom will be forever. “From this time forth and forevermore.”

This is one of the most encouraging words in this passage.

This King, Who is our…

Wonderful Counselor (and pays our debt for us)
Mighty God (Who is above all, yet stooped down to help us)
Everlasting Father (Who created us, and redeemed us)
Prince Of Peace (Who brings peace to every area of our lives)
Son Of David (Who became part of history and our story)
King of Justice (Who rights every wrong)
King of Righteousness (Who doesn’t sweep sin under the rug, yet still saves us sinners)

Will be King Forever.

Under His rule there is no more sickness, no more pain, no more death, no more sorrows.

In Jesus’ Kingdom we will forever live in light and enjoy to the fullness all that we were created for.

There’s not much else to be said.

It’s going to be truly amazing.

I think we downplay Heaven a little bit.

It seems too far off.
It’s too unknown.
It feels like we’re making up a fantasy it sounds so good.

But we’re told to look forward to His Kingdom and to rejoice that we will be living in it one day.

So, here’s some verses for you to read and ponder as we remember that our King already came on Christmas day.

He has already won the battle on the cross.

That regardless of the difficulty or hopelessness we see in life around us, we can look up to Him and know that He is the perfect and final King Who will redeem all the problems, trials and difficulties of life.

And now we’re told to spread His Gospel until He comes again to rule and reign as our perfect King, forever.

“Of the Son [Jesus] He [God, the Father] says, “Your throne, O God, is forever and ever, the scepter of uprightness is the scepter of your kingdom.” -Hebrews 1:8

“…And he will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of his kingdom there will be no end.” -Luke 1:33

“And to him was given dominion and glory and a kingdom, that all peoples, nations, and languages should serve him; his dominion is an everlasting dominion, which shall not pass away, and his kingdom one that shall not be destroyed.” -Daniel 7:14

“Then the seventh angel blew his trumpet, and there were loud voices in heaven, saying, “The kingdom of the world has become the kingdom of our Lord and of his Christ, and he shall reign forever and ever.” -Revelation 11:15

“…to Him [Jesus] be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.” -Revelation 1:6

“For in this way [by trusting in and living in the Gospel] there will be richly provided for you an entrance into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.” -2 Peter 1:11

King of Righteousness (Isaiah 9:6)

King of Righteousness (Isaiah 9:6)

“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end, on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this.”

– Isaiah 9:6-7

And so we look at today…

King of Righteousness

We’re told in this passage that the Messiah would be establish His Kingdom and would uphold it with “righteousness”.

Yesterday, we covered the phrase “with justice,” and this is very similar.

To be just means to uphold the law and to be fair.

Even our persontification of “Justice” shows impartiality: “a blindfolded woman holding scales and a sword.”

Being “righteous” is very similar, as the dictionary defines it as:
“The quality of being morally right or justifiable.”

These concepts, that the Messiah will be perfectly just, impartial, and righteous seem to go directly against what we’ve already learned about Him in that He would be our “Wonderful Counselor,” our “Wonderful Lawyer.”

How can someone fight for us guilty sinners
and yet be perfect in upholding the law?

If you’ve already read the post on how Jesus is our “Wonderful Counselor” then you already know.

But for this post, I want to remind us of another verse that reveals God’s plan through His Gospel and the Christmas story.

John begins his gospel with giving us a big picture view of God’s redemption plan, and in verse 17 he wrote:

“For the law was given through Moses;
grace and truth came through Jesus Christ.”
-John 1:17

God is full of paradoxes.
He constantly supprises us.
And that makes sense… He is God after all.

But this phrase is definitely one of the most amazing.

That Jesus, the Messiah, brought us grace and truth.

Grace…
And truth.

You see, grace is to “be regarded by someone with favor”
While truth is, “that which is true or in accordance with fact or reality.”

Now, if you’ve been following in this series,
We’ve covered at length the fact that we are sinful, imperfect, betrayers of God, and deserving of death as our punishment.

That is the truth.
That is the law.

And Jesus fully brought that truth.
He told people throughtout His ministry to “repent for the kingdom of God is near.”
Yet, Jesus also brought grace.

He brought us “favor.”

How could Jesus bring us both the truth of our sin and also the favor of God?

Only through His mercy and payment for our sins.

The Messiah remains a King Of Righteousness because He pays the price of our sin so that He can pour our His favor on us.

The Law that God brought through Moses is good – in fact it is perfect.
But it can’t save us – it merely reminds us of the truth.

That we are guilty.

Jesus didn’t do away with this truth,
Otherwise, He wouldn’t be perfectly righteous.

Instead, He brought together the most paradoxical phrase.
He brought together two things that seemed impossible…

Grace and Truth.
Mercy and Law.
Favor and Justice.

He paid our debt,
So that we could receieve mercy.
Grace.
Favor.

And He remains our King of Righteousness.

So don’t downplay the truth,
There’s no need to hide from what the truth is.

The truth is…
We’re imperfect. (Romans 3:10)
We have problems.
We are sinful.
We deserve nothing good.
In fact, we deserve death. (Romans 6:23)

But because of God’s grace, our truth is now…
We are in God’s favor. (Isaiah 61:1-2)
We have been brought into God’s family. (Ephesians 2:19)
We have new empowerment to live godly lives. (2 Peter 1:3-4)
We have daily hope in Jesus. (1 Peter 1:3-6)
We have eternal hope of heaven with God forever. (John 3:16)
We’ve been given life. (John 4:14, John 5:24)

So let’s not hide from the truth,
but let us pair it with the grace that Jesus brought us.

We are truly guilty, deserving of death.
But Jesus has paid our debt.

And we just have to accept His grace, His payment for our sins, and accept Him as Lord and Savior…

And we get to be reunited with God,
Brought back into His family,
And enjoy His favor.

May you enjoy that favor today,
And may you pass it on to others.

Let’s be sure to tell others of our great God
Who upholds justice and righteousness,
Yet loves us and has mercy and favor towards us.

King Of Justice (Isaiah 9:6)

King Of Justice (Isaiah 9:6)

“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end, on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this.”

– Isaiah 9:6-7

And so we look at today…

King Of Justice

We’re told in this passage that the Messiah would be establish His Kingdom and would uphold it with “justice”.

Justice is something we say we all want,
but in reality,
we only want justice when we’re wronged.
Now when we might face the punishment.

There’s always “someone else who’s worse.”

Well, God’s standard is perfection,
And none of fulfill that requirement.

So all those times you’ve wanted a better justice system,
A more complete justice for those who have wronged you and loved ones.

Don’t worry, we’ll get it.

The Messiah, Jesus, is the King Of Justice and will perfectly judge all wrongs.

So much wrong has been done.
And Jesus promises that none of it will go without retribution.

And He’s already started the process.

Tomorrow’s post will go into this more fully,
but it can’t be said enough:

Jesus has taken our punishment for us,
So that whoever believes in Him
May receieve life instead of the justice we all deserve.

This is what Christmas is all about.

It’s the day that God came down,
To live a perfect life
And trade our judgement, our punishment,
For His righteousness.

“For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin,
so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.”
– 2 Corinthians 5:21

“Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law
by becoming a curse for us, for it is written,
“Cursed is everyone who is hanged on a tree””
-Galatians 3:13

It’s from this “great exchange”
God’s righteousness, for our sin
That God remains perfectly just
Yet He displays His great love and mercy for us.

And since we’ve experienced such great mercy and love from our perfectly just God – let us also pass on that mercy and love to those around us.

Son Of David (Isaiah 9:6)

Son Of David (Isaiah 9:6)

“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end, on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this.”

– Isaiah 9:6-7

And so we look at today…

Son Of David

The phrase “Son of David” was a term for the messiah long before Jesus stepped onto the scene (and before this mention in Isaiah). It was in reference to the promise that God made David:

“And your house and your kingdom shall be made sure forever before me. Your throne shall be established forever.” -2 Samuel 7:16, 1 Chronicles 17:14, Psalm 89:3–4

We were directly reminded of this promise when the angel visited Mary to tell her of her pregnancy:

“And the angel said to her, “Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found favor with God. And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. And the Lord God will give to him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of his kingdom there will be no end.” -Luke 1:30–33

The promise/prophecy that the Messiah would come from the linage of David is one that extremely important – because it couldn’t be manipulated.

We don’t have a choice in what family we are born into, or where we are born. Yet there are multiple prophecies of Jesus’ birth and lineage.

It’s as if God wanted to remind us that He truly is God and knows the beginning from the end.



Side Note/Fun Facts:

When prophecy was given that the Messiah would be from the lineage of David, we have to remember that the household name/right to the throne of David, would come from the father.

This is problematic for the Messiah who was prophecied be born of a virgin. But not a problem for God.

We see that the book of Matthew (who care about prophecy) traces Jesus’ family tree to David through Mary, who is the virgin that was prophecied to give birth to the Messiah.

Luke, on the other hand, is a gentile, who trances Jesus’ family tree through Joseph to David (and even back to Adam) to show the simple humanity of Jesus.

This means that Jesus fulfills this promise to David (and other geneology promises) regardless of how you slice it, which is pretty cool.



Now, we’ve already covered many aspects of God’s plan, but there’s a special lesson to be learned from seeing this prophecy of David’s legacy that we shouldn’t miss:

God works through us, to bring results beyond us.

It’s amazing when you read the lineage of Jesus and see the names of people who were directly involved in bringing us the Messiah.

A bunch of nobodies,
broken people,
problem people.

Some of them great people of faith,
Others, not so much.

But they were involved in the greatest family tree of all time.

I bet many of them wished they had been born into a different family at some point.

Had different parents.
Different life situations.
Different genetics, skillsets, economic status.

But if they could have known that they would have been the grandmother, great-grandfather, or even great-great-great grandfather of the Messiah Who would bring salvation to the world…

They would have looked at their role differently.

I don’t know what will come of your time here.
I don’t know who you will impact.
What family trees you will be a part of.

None of us do.

But God does.

And one day, we’ll get to see the complete picture
And stand amazed at what God has done.

So, take a moment. Read the names in this list.

Some of the names might look familiar,
Others, not so much.

But God used each and every one of them.

And He is using you too,
for a greater purpose than you can see right now.



Matthew 1:1–17

The book of the genealogy of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. Abraham was the father of Isaac, and Isaac the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers, and Judah the father of Perez and Zerah by Tamar, and Perez the father of Hezron, and Hezron the father of Ram, and Ram the father of Amminadab, and Amminadab the father of Nahshon, and Nahshon the father of Salmon, and Salmon the father of Boaz by Rahab, and Boaz the father of Obed by Ruth, and Obed the father of Jesse, and Jesse the father of David the king. And David was the father of Solomon by the wife of Uriah, and Solomon the father of Rehoboam, and Rehoboam the father of Abijah, and Abijah the father of Asaph, and Asaph the father of Jehoshaphat, and Jehoshaphat the father of Joram, and Joram the father of Uzziah, and Uzziah the father of Jotham, and Jotham the father of Ahaz, and Ahaz the father of Hezekiah, and Hezekiah the father of Manasseh, and Manasseh the father of Amos, and Amos the father of Josiah, and Josiah the father of Jechoniah and his brothers, at the time of the deportation to Babylon. And after the deportation to Babylon: Jechoniah was the father of Shealtiel, and Shealtiel the father of Zerubbabel, and Zerubbabel the father of Abiud, and Abiud the father of Eliakim, and Eliakim the father of Azor, and Azor the father of Zadok, and Zadok the father of Achim, and Achim the father of Eliud, and Eliud the father of Eleazar, and Eleazar the father of Matthan, and Matthan the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom Jesus was born, who is called Christ. So all the generations from Abraham to David were fourteen generations, and from David to the deportation to Babylon fourteen generations, and from the deportation to Babylon to the Christ fourteen generations.

Luke 3:23–38

“Jesus, when he began his ministry, was about thirty years of age, being the son (as was supposed) of Joseph, the son of Heli, the son of Matthat, the son of Levi, the son of Melchi, the son of Jannai, the son of Joseph, the son of Mattathias, the son of Amos, the son of Nahum, the son of Esli, the son of Naggai, the son of Maath, the son of Mattathias, the son of Semein, the son of Josech, the son of Joda, the son of Joanan, the son of Rhesa, the son of Zerubbabel, the son of Shealtiel, the son of Neri, the son of Melchi, the son of Addi, the son of Cosam, the son of Elmadam, the son of Er, the son of Joshua, the son of Eliezer, the son of Jorim, the son of Matthat, the son of Levi, the son of Simeon, the son of Judah, the son of Joseph, the son of Jonam, the son of Eliakim, the son of Melea, the son of Menna, the son of Mattatha, the son of Nathan, the son of David, the son of Jesse, the son of Obed, the son of Boaz, the son of Sala, the son of Nahshon, the son of Amminadab, the son of Admin, the son of Arni, the son of Hezron, the son of Perez, the son of Judah, the son of Jacob, the son of Isaac, the son of Abraham, the son of Terah, the son of Nahor, the son of Serug, the son of Reu, the son of Peleg, the son of Eber, the son of Shelah, the son of Cainan, the son of Arphaxad, the son of Shem, the son of Noah, the son of Lamech, the son of Methuselah, the son of Enoch, the son of Jared, the son of Mahalaleel, the son of Cainan, the son of Enos, the son of Seth, the son of Adam, the son of God.”

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