Responding To The Fallout Of Christian Leaders (Specifically After Joshua Harris)

Responding To The Fallout Of Christian Leaders (Specifically After Joshua Harris)

You’ve probably heard the expression to “never meet your heroes” because you’ll find that they are just as flawed as everyone else.

This is never more clearly seen than in the wake of a prominent Christian leader or pastor who chooses to walk away from believing in Jesus, has a hidden sin come to light, or something similar.

In light of the popular Christian writer Josh Harris recently announcing his change of beliefs, many were unsure how to respond as he had left a big impact on their lives and their faith in Jesus.

This situation is unfortunately common, and it is important that we are ready to have a godly response.

Mercy, grace and kindness towards others

We live in a world where people are quick to judge and be critical of people and situations we know almost nothing about, and it’s no different for Christian leaders.

Even when the situation is fairly clear, we’re quick to say things and be more judgmental online than we would ever be in person (which is usually more than we should say or think anyway).

So, regarding Joshua Harris and any other well-known Christian person or pastor, we need to have even more grace towards them and their situation.

One of my favorite quotes from Chuck Smith is “blessed are the merciful, for they shall receive mercy… and I need a lot of mercy.”

He is clearly referring to Jesus’ sermon on the mount and then reminding ourselves where we fall into the equation:

We need mercy and God wants us to also extend mercy to others.

And so, we need to keep the posture described by John Bradford in his famous quote:

“But for the grace of God, there go I.”

John Bradford

Too many of us are quick to bring the torches and pitchforks, when that is the furthest thing from what Jesus would have us do.

Instead, let’s pray for the Christians in the public eye, the pastors and other leaders, who are going through extremely difficult times and know that if not for the grace of God, we would be in the same difficult position as them.

We are saved by, and follow, Jesus. Not other people

I think one of the reasons people can sometimes have such a massive knee-jerk reaction to a pastor or popularized Christian leader falling from the faith or into sin is because we have begun to put our beliefs, faith and trust in them and not Jesus.

This is especially common regarding pastors since they are teaching God’s Word week after week. But in cases like Joshua Harris, it’s easy to do the same since he rooted his messages on godly purity and lifestyle in the Bible.

And, although it’s very good to learn from others, after a while it’s tempting to put some of our faith and belief in the person teaching, rather than in Jesus, Who they are teaching about.

This problem is common, but also disastrous.

Although we are told to be thankful for our leaders, and even encouraged to imitate them so far as they imitate Christ (1 Corinthians 11:1), Jesus makes it clear that you need to have a personal connection to Him and His Spirit, and not merely one through another person.

We see this problem played out in the Bible through the life of King Joash.

He became king at a young age of 7, but it says that He held “did what was right in the eyes of the Lord all the days of Jehoiada the priest.” (2 Chronicles 24:1-2).

But do you know what happened after Jehoiada the priest died?

He turned away from God and set up idols (2 Chronicles 24:17-18).

Joash’s faith in God wasn’t personally his, just one he adopted as long as the priest he grew up with was still around.

And I’ve seen the same thing happen to people I know, and maybe it’s happened to you.

Maybe it was a grandparent or parent.
Or maybe a famous preacher or pastor.
Possibly a Christian author or actor.
Or maybe even a close friend or person you have trusted to guide you spiritually.

When these types of people turn away from Jesus, renounce their faith, or even fall into sin, it can be easy to doubt or write off everything they’ve told us.

But your faith in Jesus and your relationship with Him cannot be reliant on someone else.

Those people may have led you to Jesus, but they are not your Savior.

As important of a role as people can play in our lives, we must not let our relationship to Jesus stay channeled through them. We must embrace Jesus separately and wholly as our own.

Jesus the same. Yesterday. Today. And Forever.

People make mistakes.
People fail.
People will let us down.
But Jesus never will.

In light of any prominent Christian leader or pastor, it’s important to remember how Jesus is not like us flawed people.

He does not recant on His words.
He does not back down from Him promises.
He does not change His mind.
He is the same.

Yesterday.
Today.
And Forever.

We can put our hope and trust fully upon Jesus and He will not let us down.

So, whenever a public or personal Christian leader lets you down…

Pray for them.
Encourage them. (especially if they are close to you)
Give grace to them.

And, in everything you do,
Everything you say,
And everywhere you go:

Love others,
And stay close to Jesus.

Forgiven And Empowered To Forgive (Mark 11:25–26)

Forgiven And Empowered To Forgive (Mark 11:25–26)

Yesterday, I got to teach the kids class at church, and the section we were in was Mark 11:25–26 where Jesus teaches us the importance of forgiving others. Below are some of the main points and ideas from this passage.

And whenever you stand praying, if you have anything against anyone, forgive him, that your Father in heaven may also forgive you your trespasses. But if you do not forgive, neither will your Father in heaven forgive your trespasses.

Mark 11:25–26

The Context

It’s no surprise that this passage on forgiveness ends the story of Jesus calling people in the temple out on having the appearance of godliness, but having no fruit or substance of a relationship with God.

Jesus finishes this section with a reminder of what the fruit of godliness looks like. It’s not just outward actions, but inward heart change.

Specifically, Jesus tells us that a true disciple of His will forgive others.

Simply put, people who are forgiven by God will, in turn, forgive others.

The Importance (And Necessity Of) Forgiving Others

Jesus pulls no punches in this verse. He starts out by saying that forgiving others is so important that you should even pause your prayer to do so.

And then He goes as far to say that “But if you do not forgive, neither will your Father in heaven forgive your trespasses.

But what does He mean by that?

We see throughout scripture that God was the first to act on our need for forgiveness and salvation, and that He did so in spite of all we did and who we once were…

God saved us when we were still enemies of God (Romans 5:10)
We only love, because He first loved us (1 John 4:19)
None of us were even seeking God to begin with (Romans 3:11)

So, what does it mean that God will not forgive us if we don’t forgive others?

To answer that, it’s best to look at another parable from Jesus in Matthew 18:21-35.

Here’s the general story…

A man owed a VERY great debt and his lender forgave him of that debt.

Shortly after, this man refuses to forgive someone else’s much smaller debt and threatens him with his life.

The previous lender finds out how cruelly this man treated the other and renounces his forgiven debt as a consequence for treating the other man so poorly.

Read the full story in Matthew 18:21-35

What we learn from this parable is that God takes our life change very seriously. We are not saved by our works, but God’s grace and forgiveness is purposed to bring about a heart change.

God’s plan is to save us from the punishment for our sins (Romans 6:23), to give us a new heart (Ezekiel 36:26), to fill us with new motives (1 Corinthians 10:31), and new empowerment (2 Timothy 1:7) to live a new life that He has called us to (Titus 2:11–14).

And, this new life is not an option. It flows supernaturally from our forgiveness.

Which leads us back to the question:

Which comes first? The chicken or the egg? Does God forgive us because we forgive others? Or do we forgive others because God forgives us?

What we can learn from Jesus’ parable and the rest of scripture, is that God forgives us and empowers us to forgive others.

But, if we are not actively trying and asking God to help us to forgive others… then, how can we possibly say we’ve been forgiven by God and love Him? (1 John 4:20)

Or, to put it another way:

Forgiving others is a sign that we’ve been forgiven by God.
And a lack of forgiveness towards others is a sign that we have not experienced God’s forgiveness.

(Also, check out Luke 7:36–50 for a real life version of the parable described above).

Forgiveness vs Reconciliation

Forgiveness is always possible,
But reconciliation is not.

It’s important to note that Jesus calls us to forgive others, but that doesn’t mean things will always work out.

Simply looking at Jesus’ life will tell us that we won’t be on good terms with everyone, but we can still forgive everyone.

Paul reminds us in Romans 12:18 that we are to “live peaceably with all” but only “so far as it depends on you” recognizing that sometimes the issues we have with others are simply on their end and there is nothing we can do about it.

This doesn’t give us freedom to ever write someone off as a lost cause, as we are called to love generously and especially those who hate us, but we also shouldn’t bear the weight of a two-way relationship all on ourselves.

We can forgive others and still not receive reconciliation between ourselves and the other person, if they refuse.

Empowered To Forgive

Although we talk about our empowerment coming from God, we often constrain ourselves to only self-help methods and motivational talks which is the exact opposite of “empowered by God”.

And, as a side note, not only does self-help and self motivation only last temporarily, but God also tells us that nothing we do can be pleasing to Him without our actions coming out of our of faith in Him (Hebrews 11:6). If our motivation is one of self attainment and simply doing better, we’ve completely missed the point.

In regards to forgiveness, I’ve heard people encouraged to think about how much God loves the person you ought to forgive and that if God can forgive them, then so should you.

But this is nothing more than hype and motivational talk (and also not found in scripture).

Of course God loves them, He’s perfect!
But how does that help me to love them?

Here’s what the Bible tells us to do:

Instead of focusing on the people you ought to forgive,
You need to focus on the God who has forgiven you.

Scripture tells us that our forgiveness doesn’t come from seeing God forgive others, but as an overflow of God forgiving us, as we talked about above.

But there’s one more piece.

And that’s God’s Spirit.

When God forgives us, He doesn’t simply wipe our slate clean and then tell us to try harder.

God gives us His Spirit to teach us (John 14:26), help us (John 14:26), encourage us (Acts9.31) and empower us to follow Jesus (2 Timothy 1:7).

The Holy Spirit is God’s gift to all believers, when we are saved. And it is through Him that we become more like Jesus – including our growth in forgiving others (Acts 2:38).

Next Steps

There’s no better application than this:

Is there someone you need to forgive?
Do it now.

Is there someone you need to ask forgiveness from?
Because Jesus said pretty much the same thing about that (Matthew 5:23–24)
Go ask for forgiveness.

Do your best to bring reconciliation, as much as it depends on you.

Forgive.
Repent.
Love others like Jesus.


If you’re interested in more on this topic, below are links to my series on the fruits of the Holy Spirit:

We Need God’s Spirit to Bear the Fruit of the Spirit
The Fruit of the Spirit Is… Love
The Fruit of the Spirit Is… Joy
The Fruit of the Spirit Is… Peace
The Fruit of the Spirit Is… Patience
The Fruit of the Spirit Is… Kindness
The Fruit of the Spirit Is… Goodness
The Fruit of the Spirit Is… Faithfulness
The Fruit of the Spirit Is… Gentleness
The Fruit of the Spirit Is… Self-Control

The Cross And The Switchblade

The Cross And The Switchblade

I recently (and finally) took the time to read a book that I’ve had on my shelf for years, and I’m so glad I did.

It’s called "The Cross and the Switchblade" by David Wilkerson.

If you’re not familiar with it, it’s a biography style book telling the story of how God used David Wilkerson to start a movement reaching homeless and drug addicted youth in the New York area (and beyond).

It’s an incredible story and I encourage you to read it too. In case you don’t, here’s a brief overview, some of my favorite lessons and highlights from the book, and some of the best quotes.


Story Overview: The Cross And The Switchblade

The book starts with the story of how David Wilkerson became the pastor of a rural church. Even at this point, it’s cool to see how he truly believed God to answer prayers and guide him and his family in the big and small things.

One of the most important moments in the book, and his life, was when he decided to sell his TV and devote his evenings to prayer. In a funny and god-filled story of him essentially trying to find any excuse to keep it, he sells his TV and begins devoting extra time to prayer.

And that changed everything.

Shortly after, he came across an article of some boys in New York being put on trial for murdering a disabled child in the park. And he felt God wanted him to go there and help the boys.

Up until this point, his life had been a simple one. He obeyed God, but he had never had such an impression of God telling him to do something so crazy. After wrestling with the desire to go, he goes and is completely humiliated. No good is done and he comes back home with his tail between his legs.

From here, he gets some encouragement from his mother and wife and ends up continuing to pursue seeing what he can do to help them.

He quickly finds out that there’s nothing he can do for them, but there is much to be done for all the other kids in their situation: homeless, abusive families, drug addicted, and more.

David’s vision switches and the rest of the book is filled with "God story" after “God story”, with him doing his best to obey God and get “out of the way” so God can reach and help the at-risk youth in New York.

The book ends with an incredible big picture view of what God had done through this ministry and then giving some post-book information on what happened to some of the specific and first youth that David poured so much into.

Favorite Lessons, Highlights And Quotes

This book is packed full of encouraging lessons and reminders, but here’s just a few of my favorites…

Don’t Dismiss “Failure” So Quickly

When David first obeyed God to go to New York, it seemed like he completely failed. He didn’t help the kids, in fact, it seemed like his actions would now make it impossible to ever help them.

He had embarrassed his church, his family and even put a bad name on preachers in general.

But it was part of God’s plan.

When he stopped by his parents house on his way back home, his mother encouraged him to not so quickly say he was wrong. He felt like God told him to do it and he did. Now it was up to God to finish whatever God had started.

Pray Expectantly And Don’t Doubt It When It Starts Happening

Shortly after David started seeing results in New York, he started getting worried that this wasn’t what he should be doing. This led his wife to tell him:

"You asked the Holy Spirit for a miracle, and now that you’ve got one you’re trying to argue it away. People who don’t believe in miracles shouldn’t pray for them."

If you don’t believe in miracles, Then you shouldn’t pray for them.

But if you believe God can do anything He wants to further His Kingdom and work on this earth, Then pray. Pray expectantly.

The Lamb Chop School Of Evangelism

At one point, David reflects on some wisdom his grandfather had passed onto him regarding reaching people. It is what his grandfather called “The lamb chop school of evangelism.”

"You win over people just like you win over a dog. You see a dog passing down the street with an old bone in his mouth. You don’t grab the bone from him and tell him it’s not good for him. He’ll growl at you. It’s the only thing he has. But you throw a big fat lamb chop in front of him, and he’s going to drop that bone and pick up the lamb chop, his tail wagging to beat the band. And you’ve got a friend. Instead of going around grabbing bones from people… I’m going to throw them some lamb chops. Something with real meat and life in it. I’m going to tell them about New Beginnings."

The Story Of The Snake

When David reaches out to his grandfather for more wisdom and encouragement, he is told a story of a snake becoming new. It’s such an incredible reminder of the necessity of new birth as well as being patient while waiting, as David had to.

“Some time ago I was taking a walk through the hills when I came across an enormous snake. He was a big one, Davie, three inches thick and four feet long, and he just lay there in the sun looking scary. I was afraid of this thing and I didn’t move for a long time, and lo and behold, while I was watching, I saw a miracle. I saw a new birth. I saw that old snake shed its skin and leave it lying there in the sun and go off a new and really beautiful creature.

When you start your new work in the city, boy, don’t you be like I was, petrified by the outward appearance of your boys. God isn’t. He’s just waiting for each one of them to crawl right out of that old sin-shell and leave it behind. He’s waiting and yearning for the new man to come out.

Never forget that, David, when you see your snakes, as you surely you will, on the sidewalks of New York."

Do What We Can Do And Ask God To Do What Only He Can Do

The final quote I want to leave you with is a reminder that God has purposed us for good works, but only He can bring healing and new life.

"We humans can work hard for each other, and we should, and we must work. But it is God, and only God, who heals.”

This is a reoccurring theme throughout the book.

Many times, David would begin to experience some forward motion in the ministry God put before him, and he would start feeling the pressure to keep it going. Quickly, God would remind him that he was “trying too hard”. That he was trying to lift a weight that only God could do.

Yes, David had to do his best and work hard, but only God could bring the results that would make any of it worthwhile.

And this is true for all of our lives, as we are reminded in Zechariah 4:6 and Galatians 3:3:

"Then he said to me, ‘This is the word of the Lord to Zerubbabel: Not by might, nor by power, but by my Spirit, says the Lord of hosts.’" – Zechariah 4:6

"Are you so foolish? Having begun by the Spirit, are you now being perfected by the flesh?" – Galatians 3:3

It’s easy to want to step in and “help God” in what only He can do, but we must resist that urge. God has given us plenty to do, so let us focus on that and ask Him to do what only He can do.

Final Thoughts

My life, and your life, will look very different from David’s. God has different plans for each of us, but can you imagine how our lives would be different if we approached God and His plan for our lives more like David did?

Willing to put aside everything for whatever He had… Willing to be put outside of our comfort zone… Willing to step out in faith and sacrifice money, pleasures, status, our plans and more for His plan and work…

I pray mine will continue to become more like David’s, and I pray yours will too.

Again, I encourage you to read the book. It’s an incredible and encouraging story of what God can do when someone gives their life to God for whatever He would have.

Verses For When You Face Discouragement And Hard Times

Verses For When You Face Discouragement And Hard Times

You may have heard the saying: “If a person is breathing, he needs encouragement,” and that can’t be more true.

If you Google “words of encouragement”, you’ll find dozens of websites that offer encouraging words and shareable quotes… but the reality is that most of the encouraging words you’ll find (and what most of what we say to encourage others) are simply skin-deep phrases that give empty hope.

They can be encouraging for a moment, but they don’t last, because they are built on emotions and ideas that easily come and go.

Even the ones that promise more are nothing more than hopeful thoughts because they come from someone who cannot give you more than simply wishing the best for you; they can’t actually do anything about it.

I’m not saying that it’s wrong to encourage people by saying “it’s ok, things will turn around” but think about what we’re saying: what if it doesn’t “turn around”?

We live in the present, and none of us can foresee the future.

So, what can bring us a permanent and solid foundation for encouragement?
Or better asked: Who can do this?

The simple answer is: God.

The One Who created everything (Genesis 1:1),
Who breathed stars into existence (Psalm 33:6),
Who holds our very breath in our hands (Job 12:10),
And Who loves us more than we can imagine.

God has the ability to give true encouragement.

So, if you are looking for something to keep your head up,
To get you through a difficult time
To have something in your back pocket (because difficult times will come)
Or you simply want to have encouraging words ready for others…

The Bible is full of truths that we are called to rest in and so there are many more, but here’s just a few of my favorites for you to reflect on.

I’ve broken them into a couple sections based on topic.

God Has A Plan

Sometimes, it’s simply comforting enough to know that none of this is random, but that God (Who loves you very much) sees the pain you’re going through, can relate to it, and has a plan in mind.

This first verse is one of my favorites because it spells out the two most important things:

  1. Our plans, thoughts, and ideas are different from God’s
  2. God’s plan is better (just in case we thought our, different plan was better)

“For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, declares the Lord. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts.”

Isaiah 55:8–9

Your Suffering Isn’t Wasted, God Will Use It

Difficult times and suffering are hard enough, but suffering without a worthwhile purpose or result is even worse.

Think about it this way: If you saved a child from being run over by a car, but you broke your arm in the process, most of us would say it’s worth it. But if you suddenly woke up one day with a broken arm, that would be much harder to deal with. It’s the same pain and inconvenience, but one of them felt worth it.

In the same way, when we suffer in life, God tells us that everything we go through will be worth it in the end. We don’t see how now, but He tells us to trust Him, and that in the light of eternity we will see Him use everything we suffered as part of a worthwhile plan…

“Count it all joy, my brothers, when you meet trials of various kinds, for you know that the testing of your faith produces steadfastness. And let steadfastness have its full effect, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing.”

James 1:2–4

“If we are afflicted, it is for your comfort and salvation; and if we are comforted, it is for your comfort, which you experience when you patiently endure the same sufferings that we suffer.”

2 Corinthians 1:6

“For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison.”

2 Corinthians 4:17

Don’t Give Up, Keep Trusting God

The most important thing is to simply keep going. Emotions and feelings will come and go and discouraging times are temporary. As the saying goes, “Don’t trade what you know about God for what you don’t know about what He’s doing.” Just because it’s difficult doesn’t mean it’s time to give up. I’ve personally been through some extremely discouraging times but have seen the worthwhile result of continuing to do what I know is right even when that’s the last thing I want to do.

This first verse was actually sent to us by 2 different people in the same day during a time when my wife and I were going through a very difficult season in our lives (thankfully, not difficult towards each-other, but outside factors) and so it has remained particularly encouraging to me and I hope it is to you as well.

“And let us not grow weary of doing good, for in due season we will reap, if we do not give up.”

Galatians 6:9

These next verses form one of my favorite passages of scripture to look to when I need encouragement. It is such a beautifully sounding verse and so inspiring, but when you look at the situation he’s describing, it’s terrible.

Habakkuk is painting a picture of starvation and hopelessness. There is no food for today (no “fruit on the vines”), there is no harvest on the horizon (fig trees would blossom before producing their fruit), and there’s not any hope of new animals being born for food either (no herds in the stalls and the flocks are gone).

Yet, in this “it’s bad, and there’s no chance it will get better” situation, Habakkuk finds it possible to trust God and even find joy in Him. And so can we.

“Though the fig tree should not blossom, nor fruit be on the vines, the produce of the olive fail and the fields yield no food, the flock be cut off from the fold and there be no herd in the stalls, yet I will rejoice in the Lord; I will take joy in the God of my salvation. God, the Lord, is my strength; he makes my feet like the deer’s; he makes me tread on my high places.”

Habakkuk 3:17–19

God Wants You To Go To Him With Your Problems

This one is most important. We can believe everything correctly, but we can still miss the most important part: God Himself. He wants a relationship with you and you can know everything I’ve written above without ever going to Him or talking to Him about your situation. He is the “God of all comfort” and wants you to come to Him with all your problems.

He might not fix everything going on, but He wants you to go to Him for comfort, strength and provision in the mist of every difficultly and problem in life. He is the Giver of all life and can sustain you even in difficult times.

But you can’t simply know that to receive His grace,
You have to go to Him to receive it.
And He’s waiting for you to do just that.

“You keep him in perfect peace whose mind is stayed on you, because he trusts in you.”

Isaiah 26:3

“But they who wait for the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint.”

Isaiah 40:31

“Casting all your anxieties on him, because he cares for you.”

1 Peter 5:7

“Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.”

Philippians 4:6–7

May you rest in God and go to Him in the good times and the bad, so that we might live like the “man who trusts in the Lord” that Jeremiah described:

“Blessed is the man who trusts in the Lord, whose trust is the Lord. He is like a tree planted by water, that sends out its roots by the stream, and does not fear when heat comes, for its leaves remain green, and is not anxious in the year of drought, for it does not cease to bear fruit.”

Jeremiah 17:7–8
The Birthday Of a Friend Who Has Passed

The Birthday Of a Friend Who Has Passed

This last Wednesday was the birthday of a friend of mine.

He was one of many recovering drug addicts and homeless who my wife and I invited into our lives when we very first moved down to Florida to help start a church.

For a time, we had a small group of people that met in our apartment. There were a few consistent people and many who would pass through over time. We would also end up spending Christmas mornings and other holidays with them as so few of them had family who live down here.

This friend is one of the first of many who we got to lead to Jesus and help in their recovery and homelessness.

He was the first of those friends to die.
And last Wednesday would have been his birthday.

We’ve thankfully only had one other close friend die from overdose, but for some reason (I don’t know if it’s time of life or something else) I have experienced more family and friend death in the past 7 years than ever before.

He was one of the first.

And when he died, I made a decision to keep his birthday in my calendar, and I’ve chosen to keep this habit with everyone ever since.

Simply Loving People

His birthday held special memories for me, which led to this new habit.

He, like many of the addicts we met down here, rarely got to celebrate his birthday with close friends or family because of his addiction. As we held a small group at our apartment, we held many birthdays and it never ceased to amaze me how much people appreciated it, addicts and non-addicts alike.

In a world where everyone gets well-wishes on Facebook, the simple text or phone call means so much more. And, to actually sit in a room around simple cupcakes and sing ‘happy birthday’, is almost unheard of.

These small birthday celebrations and times together in our home led to many experiencing God’s love and hope in a way I couldn’t have replicated in any other way.

And God used simple moments like these to save multiple people in our very living room, and I’ll never forget them.

The Importance Of Remembering

Part of the reason I keep people’s birthdays in my calendar, even after they have passed, is it helps me remember them, and more importantly, the things I learned from them.

Specifically: many of the people in my calendar remind me that God is not done. So many of them seemed like “lost causes” yet many of them experienced massive life and heart change by the grace of Jesus, and I never want to forget that.

Whether homeless and drug addicted,
“Old” and “Set in their ways,”
Argumentative and seemingly impossible to reason with…

Many of them found Jesus before their last breath.

And it reminds me of the many birthdays in my calendar who are not long gone, but may one day turn to Jesus as well.

Life Is Short

The 3rd and final reason I keep friends’ birthdays in my calendar, even after they’ve passed, is simply this:

It reminds me that tomorrow is not promised.

One day, you and I will breathe our last and will stand before God and eternity. And as David wrote in Psalms:

“So teach us to number our days
that we may get a heart of wisdom.”

Psalm 90:12

Every month, as I look at the people who used to celebrate birthdays in that month, I am reminded that the things I do today will have an eternal impact, and I don’t know when my story here on earth will end.

And I want my days to count.

You might find my habit weird, but I’m happy I started it. And if nothing else, I hope this reminds you…

To simply love people today,
To keep hope that God can work in even the most desperate situations and people
And to live life to the fullest of God’s calling on your life, because you don’t know when you will meet Him face-to-face.

Receiving Life From Jesus, Unlike The Rich Young Ruler (Mark 10:17–27)

Receiving Life From Jesus, Unlike The Rich Young Ruler (Mark 10:17–27)

A couple weeks ago, I got to teach the older kids class at our church, and as you might guess, our text was Mark 10:17–27 about the Rich Young Ruler. I thought I’d share it with you, so below I’ve put the highlights from our study that we had together…

What must I do?

And as he [Jesus] was setting out on his journey, a man ran up and knelt before him and asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”

Mark 10:17

It’s pretty obvious that the Rich Young Ruler wants to get to heaven on his own merit. Even his question “what must I do” implies he wants a task to accomplish.

And, he’s not alone, we all like the idea of earning things, and wanting to earn our way to heaven is no exception.

But there’s a major problem: none of us are perfect (Romans 3:23).

And as the young man is going to find out, he can’t get enteral life on his own…

Attaining Perfection

And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good except God alone. You know the commandments: ‘Do not murder, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and mother.’ ”

And he said to him, “Teacher, all these I have kept from my youth.”

And Jesus, looking at him, loved him, and said to him, “You lack one thing: go, sell all that you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.”

Disheartened by the saying, he went away sorrowful, for he had great possessions.

Mark 10:18–22

As we read what Jesus tells him, we realize that was Jesus is telling the young man is that he must be perfect to attain eternal life. Jesus begins by reminding him of a few of the 10 commandments listing the standard given by God for perfection.

The young man tells Jesus that he has kept all of the outward commandments and so Jesus then proceeds to remind him of the inward ones.

Notice that Jesus says “You lack one thing”. He goes from the general laws to the specific issue that this man faces.

And here’s why: Money had become this young man’s functional god. He had broken the first commandment: “you shall have no other gods before me”.

In the case of the Rich Young Ruler, his love of money was at least one of the many things that kept him from God’s perfection (and let’s be honest, how many of us would be willing to give up everything we have if Jesus told us to).

But Money Isn’t Even the Real Issue

Jesus never asks anyone else in scripture to completely give up their money (even more on that later). And because of that, we can infer that He was trying to make a point: We can’t earn our way to heaven because we’re all imperfect.

Jesus chose the thing that He knew the man would not give up, and we all have those things, don’t we? We all hold imperfections in our character and hearts that keep us from the perfection that eternal life with God requires.

In fact, money is simply a tangible asset that enables us to hold on to things as our functional savior instead of surrendering to God.

Here’s a few examples of things that money can “give” us so that we hold onto money instead of holding onto God…

Power
Popularity
Fame
Security
Possessions
Freedom
Success
Admiration
The list goes on…

Obviously, money cannot provide any of these things perfectly (that’s kind of the point), but they can become false substitutes for what only God can give us.

We don’t know what the Rich Young Ruler struggled with most, but it’s no denying that money can take on many different roles in our lives and it can easily keep us from having God be our only and first love.

So, What Did Jesus Really Want From The Young Man?

Ultimately, God doesn’t care about our money, possessions or skills. We are imperfect sinners and so the best we can offer is still tainted with sin.

Jesus wanted him to humbly surrender.

He wanted the young man to stop
To realize he couldn’t measure up to God’s perfection
And for him to accept God’s grace.

The young man was created to enjoy a complete and whole relationship with God and to live in a way that reflected God as a result.

Unfortunately, his (and our) sin gets in the way and we become disconnected from God, Who is the Giver of life. And we cannot be reconnected to Him without becoming perfect.

In this passage, Jesus is essentially telling the Rich Young Ruler that he needs to be perfect to “inherit eternal life”. And so Jesus points out an area of imperfection in his life and says it has to be corrected in order for him to earn his way to heaven, all the while knowing that it would be too much for the man to do.

Unfortunately, it’s not even that simple.

In order to earn our relationship back with God, we must be perfect our entire lives: so even if you “clean up” now, it’s already too late!

What Jesus really wanted from this conversation was for the Rich Young Ruler to realize he wasn’t good enough to inherit eternal life and that what he really needed a Savior, just like everyone else.

“Then Who Can Be Saved?”

And Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, “How difficult it will be for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God!”

And the disciples were amazed at his words. But Jesus said to them again, “Children, how difficult it is to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God.”

And they were exceedingly astonished, and said to him, “Then who can be saved?”

Mark 10:23-26

After the Rich Young Ruler determines he cannot go to heaven on his own merit, he walks away sorrowful.

Have you ever considered this problem before?

God’s requirement is perfection, and there is no way that you or I are meeting that.

For many of us, just like him, this is the end of the story.

If only he had stayed a little longer.

Because after he left, Jesus told His disciples that it is extremely difficult for wealthy people to enter the kingdom of heaven. And He then follows it up with comparing it to a camel going through the eye of a needle (which is not going to happen).

Their response is what we should all ask: “then who can be saved?”

And that is a very good question.

**Please note that when Jesus said it’s difficult for a rich person to enter the Kingdom of God, He is not saying that it’s wrong to be rich. What I believe Jesus was getting at is that when you are rich, you are all the more able to hide behind and hold onto the things in your heart that separate you from relying on God. It’s simply harder to choose to surrender and trust God as first in your life when you have such a tangible ability to “trust in yourself” for all of life’s needs and problems. Jesus is merely saying that it is a natural roadblock to salvation, not that it is wrong to be rich.**

What Jesus Offers Us (And The Rich Young Ruler)

Jesus looked at them and said, “With man it is impossible, but not with God. For all things are possible with God.”

Mark 10:27

If only the young man had stuck around.

He had finally come to the end of himself.
He had finally realized that he could not earn eternal life.
He had tried his hardest,
And when he realized that wasn’t good enough,
He figured that was the end of it.
(After all, he was rich and probably didn’t ask for help often)

But he had forgotten about the only One Who could really help.

He Had Forgotten About God.

The Rich Young Ruler, unfortunately, left before Jesus had a chance to remind Him that God’s grace is an option for Him to inherit eternal life.

What’s a little ironic, is that the Rich Young Ruler wanted to know what he could do to “inherit eternal life” when an inheritance is far from earned.

To inherit eternal life, you merely have to become an heir. In this case, an heir of God.

And we once were heirs,
Until sin entered the world and our hearts.
From then on out we were separated from God,
And removed from His inheritance.

There is nothing we can do,
as the Rich Young Ruler found out.

We can’t offer God a complete and perfect heart and life.

But what the Rich Young Ruler missed was this:

There was something God could, and would, do.
To give us the inheritance we could not earn ourselves.
And He was standing right in front of him.

As part of His Salvation plan,
Jesus would take His rightful inheritance,
And would trade it for our lack of inheritance.

The Rich Young Ruler (and all of us as well) wanted to earn his way, but as Paul wrote in Romans “the wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23). And that’s not a good wage.

But in that same verse we learn that “the grace of God is eternal life” (Romans 6:23).

You want to earn eternal life?
Sorry, that ship has sailed.
That’s not going to happen.

But are you willing to receive it?

Are you willing to accept God’s free gift through His Son?
That Jesus paid your price,
That Jesus accepted the wages for your sin,
And that Jesus gave you His rightful inheritance?

Then you can receive, you can inherit, eternal life.

What Happens If We Receive This Free Gift?

If you accept Jesus’ free gift of life, there’s a few things that happen.

  1. He gives His Spirit to be inside of you (and every receiver), to be with you, and to transform you to be more like Him. Remember, we were created to worship God, be in relationship with Him, and reflect Him in our lives. By receiving Jesus’ free gift of eternal life, your eternal life starts now. Instead of waiting for eternity, God wants to start now. He wants you to be close to Him, now.
  2. As you continue to rely on His grace for your inheritance, and on His Spirit for your daily life, you will supernaturally become more like Him. These changes will take place in personal inward thoughts and desires, and also in your outward actions and words. This is a continuation of the first part as mentioned earlier that our relationship and closeness to God is what continues to transform us to be more like Him.

And there is no better example for this story than the rich man who was saved shortly after this passage.

In Luke 19:1-10, we meet Zacchaeus who is not only a rich person, but clearly an unethical one as he was a chief tax collector. To spare you the details, he essentially gets saved and tells Jesus he’s going to repay everyone back what he has stolen from them and essentially obey the Hebrew law that God put in place.

He’s not giving away all his wealth. He’ll actually probably still be fairly wealthy when he’s done.

Yet he is saved, while the other wasn’t.

It’s because his salvation didn’t come from his work,
It came from receiving Jesus’ grace.

Zacchaeus received Jesus’ message of repentance and forgiveness and was transformed because of it.

Is he perfect?
No.

But he was saved, has been given eternal life and now is being transformed by God from the inside out.

Did he give away all he had?
No.

But he joyfully gave back what he had stolen, and I am sure that if he remained in Jesus’ grace and love, he continued to joyfully give, love and surrender in many areas of life, including his finances.

The Difference Between The Two Rich Men

In these passages we saw two rich men.

The first wanted to earn his eternal life.
The second realized it was a free gift.

The first desired to earn an inheritance by being perfect himself.
The second was given an inheritance through Jesus’ perfection.

The first could not be perfect and walked away to continue earning his wage of death.
The second received eternal life and began living a generous and love filled life that reflected the great gift he had been given.

The first left feeling like his life was probably over.
The second left feeling like his life was just beginning.

Which do you feel like today?
Which do you want to be like?

The Prayer Of Salvation

To close this post, I wanted to remind you of another rich man who found eternal life in one of Jesus’ parables. In the chapter previous in Luke’s Gospel, Jesus tells of a tax collector who went to the temple to pray and left righteous. Here is all he prayed:

“…the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!’

Luke 18:13

Do you have that same prayer of repentance and humility?
Do you hold to that same mercy that God offers us through Jesus?

It’s your only way to eternal life.


If you already know Jesus, then reflect back on His grace and come back to those first joys of salvation. We all tend to drift away from that feeling and mindset, and it is important to draw near again.

If you don’t already know Jesus, please contact me with any questions you have about what it means to be forgiven for sins, have enteral life, and to know and follow Jesus.

How To Study The Bible (Part 2)

How To Study The Bible (Part 2)

Last week, we covered the attitude we need to have when approaching the Bible to study it. If you haven’t read that yet, I encourage you to at THIS LINK.

Now that we’ve prepared our hearts to receive from God’s Word, we’re going to cover the simple three step process and tools for you to study the Bible with.

1. Observation

All good study begins with observation. This takes the form of noticing key characters, events, locations, etc.

Sometimes this means looking at a book of the Bible as a whole to know more about the context, such as who was the author and who was the original reader, but oftentimes we can gain enough to understand a passage by reading a few verses beforehand and a few after in order to see what the author was trying to communicate.

Remember that the original writing wasn’t broken up by chapters and verses (except for the Psalms and some of Proverbs) and so consider reading a previous chapter to gain more context. By observing, we can learn the context for something that was said or done.

One helpful tip for this section is to use the 5 W’s and an H.

Look at the text and ask yourself, who is this about, what is happening, when is this happening, where did it take place and how is it happening or how is God working in this situation, etc.

But save the last “w" (why) for the next section…

2. Interpretation

Observing words and actions without interpretation is meaningless.

After observing the passage, we are confronted with a big "so what?” What truth is God communicating to us through this passage? Why is this important or valuable?

And the primary way we can learn to interpret scripture well is through other verses in the Bible.

Imagine that someone wrote a very detailed explanation of the reason for life and how to live it well.

That book would be riddled with references to other sections within the same book to help gain clarity and context without rewriting all of the same content.

Now imagine that book was written thousands of years ago in another language and culture and has now been brought to your native language but has kept all of it’s cultural references.

That would be very much like the Bible we have today.

So, what do we do with all of these internal references and explanations and having cultural references that are not our own?

A big piece of interpretation is bridging the gap between how the original readers would understand a passage and how our western and modern eyes read it.

This gap, thankfully, is something we can learn to adjust to, and as we learn more scripture, it become increasingly easier.

To start, however, there are many resources at our disposal. We have many specific books, podcasts, and online helps listed on my “Bible Study Resources Page”, but here are a few ideas:

  • Sermons – Many great pastors have broken down parts of the Bible and explained interpretation for any of us to be able to listen to at our leisure online.

  • Verse References – Many Bibles include verse references to show passages that relate to the passage you’re reading. Not every verse will seem applicable, but many have obvious connections that help bring understanding to the meaning of the passage. Blue Letter Bible in particular has a great section for each verse in the Bible called their "treasury of scripture" feature that lists related verses.

  • Concordances – Similar to verse references, concordances show each place a specific word is used. Keep in mind that because the Bible was originally written in different languages, we are reading translated versions which means that sometimes you could look up a word and have it point to sections that use other words, but they were the same word in the original language. This also helps bring clarity to the meaning the purpose of a passage of scripture. The Strongs and Vines concordances are the most common, and both can be found for free on Blue Letter Bible as well.

  • Commentaries – Much like sermons, commentaries break down sections of scripture and normally are more in depth and focused on simply interpretation rather than application (depending on the commentary). I personally use many commentaries, but I think the Warren Wiersbe Commentaries set listed on my RESOURCES PAGE is one of the most helpful if you only have time for one. As another great suggestion, and my wife’s favorite, is by David Guzik which can be found on Blue Letter Bible for free.

3. Application

After we interpret the meaning of a passage, we are left with a complete waste of time unless we apply the passage to our lives.

This means that we need to connect the information we’ve received to a direct and practical response that can be lived out in our own lives.

I, like many others, believe that there is only one interpretation of scripture, but that there can be many applications.

For example, let’s take 1 Timothy 1:15 which states that "Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners – of whom I am the worst."

The interpretation, of this passage is that Jesus came into the world as our Savior with the purpose of saving everyone and anyone is is willing to receive His salvation.

Furthermore, we recognize that all sin is extremely devastating to our relationship with God and therefore we cannot judge others as worse than ourselves in order to gain a status above them or become judgmental on them, as demonstrated by Paul in this passage.

  • One application we could take is to remember how much we personally need the grace of God, and that we are never too far from God for His grace to save, redeem, and transform us. So we humble ourselves before God and ask Him to forgive us for sins and to transform us to be more like Him.
  • A second way we could apply this passage is to focus on the part where it reminds us that Christ Jesus came to save sinners. This was His whole purpose, and He has called us to share this Gospel. Not only is it our calling to share Jesus’ grace with others, but the latter part of the verse reminds us that He can save anyone, and because of that we are to take any opportunity we are given to share His Gospel.

These are just two ways we could apply this passage, but notice that we never deviated from the basic interpretation of the message. Its truth remained the same wherever we applied it.

Similar to a bandage that can be applied to any part of the body, God’s Word is meant to be applied in many areas of our lives.

To conclude these big ideas, I want to leave you with an analogy from everyday life that will hopefully take away some of the intimidation of studying the Bible.

Imagine you’re in your kitchen and you notice that the light on your dishwasher is on (OBSERVATION).

Because the light is on, you’re aware that the dishwasher is currently running (INTERPRETATION)

And since the dishwasher is running, you decide to put the dish in the sink rather than inside the dishwasher, since then you’d end up with water all over your floor (APPLICATION).

That example may seem simplistic, but that’s really all that is happening when we read the Bible.

Yes, you may need to look at the dishwasher’s manual in order to understand what that light means just as we go to commentaries and other parts of scripture, but the concept is still the same.

I hope this has helped diffuse any fear of reading the Bible that you may have, and that it has equipped you to study it better.

Please remember that no matter what the cost of understanding the Bible, this is the most important and valuable thing you will ever do.

Without studying and submitting to God’s Word, we cannot hope to see God Himself and have a transformed life with Him. When we study and apply God’s Word well, we can say, like the Psalmist:

"I rejoice at Your Word like one who finds great spoil.” Psalm 119:162

How To Study The Bible (Part 1)

How To Study The Bible (Part 1)

The Bible is much more than just a book. Even more than a compilation of 66 books.

The Bible has been described as "God lowering Himself to the status of an author," and since He has, we should read and respond to it as though it must be the most valuable piece ever written.

But where do we start? How do we begin reading the Bible?

People attend seminaries and various schools and study the Bible for their entire life, while still claiming there’s more to learn – and I believe them. If God truly wrote a book, I’d expect it’s entire depth and teaching to be beyond anything I could grasp in my lifetime.

At the same time, the Bible is simple enough for any of us to gain all that we need to have a full and vibrant life and relationship God.

It’s been said that the Bible is shallow enough for the youngest child to splash in its water, yet deep enough for the most studious scholar to never reach its bottom. It is this Word that we have the pleasure, benefit, and duty to ready, study, and apply.

Because of the depth of God’s Word, we can’t go into all aspects of studying it, but I think part of the problem most people face is that they let the depth of the Bible paralyze them from gleaning anything. If this describes you, I want to help you.

The simple inductive Bible method we’ll go over is:

  1. Observation
  2. Interpretation
  3. Application

We’re going to look at this three step process next week, in a way that will help us study any passage of scripture, but before we do, there’s an attitude and approach to reading God’s Word that we need to clarify:

1. The purpose of studying the Bible is to know Jesus better

Jesus told the Pharisees in John 5:39, “you study the scriptures, for in them you think you have life, but it is they that speak of Me.”

Jesus was telling the Bible scholars of His day that they missed the entire point of the scriptures they devoted their lives to studying. They had studied the Bible in hopes that they could be saved because of their religious activity, while God’s purpose in His Word is for us to find our salvation in a life-giving and life-changing relationship with Jesus.

Whenever we read the Bible simply as a self-help book or tips to a better life, we miss the entire point of drawing nearer to Jesus.

2. This is a supernatural endeavor

I don’t mean to say that studying the Bible is not also a scholarly endeavor, it is actually both.

However, I think too often we try to boil down the Bible to merely a really amazing piece of writing and not the actual Word of God which requires our spiritual eyes to be open and not merely our physical ones.

In order to truly understand and apply God’s Word to our lives, we need to come before God humbly, knowing that only He can teach us spiritual things and give us life. I encourage everyone to begin their time in God’s Word with prayer, asking Him to speak to them and work in their lives through His Word.

3. Are we the teacher, or God?

I know this seems silly to even say, but so often we can come to God’s Word with our own agenda and want God to simply enforce our current beliefs.

If there are never truths in God’s Word that require you to change your belief or submit to it even though you naturally disagree, then you are not letting God be your teacher, but you are instead trying to read your predetermined beliefs into the Bible.

As one pastor recalled, when someone had asked him what he should do if he disagreed with something the Bible said, the pastor told the man, “Then you must be wrong, and you should change your belief.”

Sometimes we try to be God’s teacher rather than letting God teach us. If you come to the Bible with this perspective, you will not receive from the Bible what God would desire you to have.

4. None of this matters if we don’t apply it

Although the third step in this inductive Bible method (Application) is simply applying what we read in scripture, it’s important to come to God’s Word with a desire to have change in our hearts and lives.

The book of James warns us that we can become hard to the Word and that our faith is not true faith if it doesn’t affect our lives (James 1:22-25). We should always be on guard of hearing God’s truth and not acting on it because as we begin that cycle it becomes easier and easier to not obey and follow Jesus.

It’s only after we have prepared our heart and mind for God’s Word that we are ready to study the Bible. Next week, we’ll cover some different tools and methods you can use to study the Bible for yourself.

Fathers: Reflecting God’s Image

Fathers: Reflecting God’s Image

Since we celebrated Father’s Day yesterday, I wanted to write some encouragement to the fathers in my life as well as anyone who has struggled with the “father figure” in their life.

If you missed (or would like a refresher) on what I wrote for Mother’s Day, I’m going to be be building off of that same foundation. You can check out my post on that at this link: Mothers: Reflecting God’s Image.

Mother’s Day Recap

God Is Seen In Every Person And Position and it is important to realize that God is revealing different parts of His character and giving us different ways to relate to Him when He compares Himself to a king, a mother, a shepherd, or even a father.

Unfortunately, We (As Examples Of God) Are Broken And Imperfect and that means that regardless of how “good” of an example we have in those ways, we do not know of a single perfect example besides God Himself – and this includes the father’s we’ve known.

Regardless of the Examples We’ve Seen (Good or Bad), God Desires All Of Them to Point to Him and His Perfection, which brings us to the context of Father’s Day.

(again, you can check out my Mothers: Reflecting God’s Image post for more details on the above points).

Fatherhood Displayed In Today’s Culture

Out of all the analogies the Bible uses to explain God’s relationship to us, God as our “Heavenly Father” is one of the most common, and I believe holds a special place in the Bible.

We read that even Jesus Himself taught us to relate to God as “our Father Who is in heaven” (Matthew 6:9) which can be difficult for many of us to understand and appreciate in today’s culture.

Unfortunately, fathers have become the ridicule of movies, TV shows, and general storytelling. Fathers are generally shown to be absent, overly harsh, or completely incompetent – and these descriptions sadly represent what many have personally experienced.

Because of these poor examples, we have become completely ignorant of what a “God Who is our Father” is like – and what our own fathers ought to be like.

Our Heavenly (And Perfect) Father

Whether you are a father, or want to be able to see God’s Fatherhood in your life more clearly, the Bible is always the best place to go. Below is a small list of attributes that tells us how God displays His Fatherhood in our lives.

“Father of the fatherless and protector of widows is God in his holy habitation.” – Psalm 68:5

“As a father shows compassion to his children, so the Lord shows compassion to those who fear him.” – Psalm 103:13

“My son, do not despise the Lord’s discipline or be weary of his reproof, for the Lord reproves him whom he loves, as a father the son in whom he delights.” – Proverbs 3:11–12

“But now, O Lord, you are our Father; we are the clay, and you are our potter; we are all the work of your hand.” – Isaiah 64:8

“Ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks it will be opened. Or which one of you, if his son asks him for bread, will give him a stone? Or if he asks for a fish, will give him a serpent? If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father who is in heaven give good things to those who ask him!” – Matthew 7:7–11

“And have you forgotten the exhortation that addresses you as sons? ‘My son, do not regard lightly the discipline of the Lord, nor be weary when reproved by him. For the Lord disciplines the one he loves, and chastises every son whom he receives.’” – Hebrews 12:5–6

God is our perfect Father…

The Standard For Fatherhood Has Been Set (And Unmet)

As a father of two, I can tell you that I fall short of God’s fatherly perfection, as described above, on a daily basis.

And if you too look at the list above and feel completely lacking or insufficient, that’s completely normal and even good. When comparing ourselves to God, we should see areas we lack and come up short.

But it shouldn’t leave us there.

The Bible continually tells us to strive for perfection, to be Holy as God is Holy and to live up to the standards we were created to be like… But we simply can’t on our own.

As Paul explains in the book of Romans, the law (the revealing of God’s standard of perfection) was NOT created so we could pull ourselves up to God’s level: to try harder and do better. No, God’s perfect standard was revealed to show us our imperfection and that we need Him.

So, where does that leave us?

Well, if you recognize your lack, it should point you to God, to ask for His help.

The Redeemer Of Imperfections

I don’t want anyone reading this to reflect on their imperfections and to feel like they’ve done, or experienced, irreversible damage.

Fortunately, God offers grace to cover all of our shortcomings: including in fatherhood.

We have all seen kids grow up incredibly well in spite of poor father figures and this should bring us comfort knowing that God can redeem any failings we have. Whether as the father, or as the child: God is our heavenly Father who brings beauty from ashes.

I hope that seeing God’s perfection in Fatherhood would serve you as a reminder that since we have imperfections, we ought to seek God for Him to make us into fathers more like Himself and to provide grace in our shortcomings.

The Ultimate Goal of Fatherhood (And Their Children)

Regardless of how well you parent or experienced parenting, there is certainly one thing that cannot be missed:

None of it has any eternal value without Jesus.

As a father, I know I have (and will) mess up.

Sometimes in small ways, other times in big ways.

But I also know my goal as a parent:

That, even in my imperfections In my struggles In my repentance In my words In my prayers In my actions In my life

That I would point my kids to Jesus and pray they follow Him as well.

And that is successful fatherhood.

Representing the loving God to your children But making it clear to them at the same time:

There is a Father Who is their truest and ultimate Father.

That, just as the sacrificial system in the Old Testament was a shadow and picture of Jesus Who is our perfect Savior, I want my fathering to them to be a shadow and picture of God who is their perfect Father.

That I am their father on earth But God is their Father in heaven.

I am their father temporarily But God is their Father for eternity.

That even in my imperfections They can look to their Heavenly Father Who is perfect.

Everything else is good.

To teach them how to live wisely, act kindly, work hard and enjoy life:

But to teach them Who God is and His love for them surpasses all those other things.

What To Do Now

Whether you have experienced a godly example for a father Or if you have even been one yourself,

We all can learn from our fathers.

Some good Some bad

But we can all take away that they are examples, guides, and shadows pointing to our heavenly Father Who is perfect.

So, celebrate Father’s Day.

For fathers, enjoy getting to be such an important example of God in your children’s lives, And be comforted in your shortcomings knowing that we are all imperfect, and rejoice knowing your (and your child’s) heavenly Father is truly perfect.

And for children (kids and adults) on this special day, take some time to enjoy your father, Thanking God for every part of them, And for giving a role in your life that was made to point you to God.

The Love Of God

The Love Of God

A little over a year ago, I was awoken around 7am on a Sunday morning and was asked if I could preach last minute at church that morning. It was sudden and unexpected so I had to immediately go to God and ask Him what He would have for that fated morning.

As I was reflected on various truths and Bible passages I was brought to a very simple, yet often overlooked one, and I knew it was needed:

The Love of God.

The Love of God is a theme I’ve revisited many times and is one that I have to remind myself of often and I felt I should share it with you as well.

Although we live in a culture that has devalued and misconstrued love as something you feel or an undirected affirmation of anything someone else wants, God’s love towards us is an undying care an affection that we could study our entire lives and never reach it’s depths or expanse.

One of my favorite hymns describes God’s love this way…

Could we with ink the ocean fill, And were the skies of parchment made, Were every stalk on earth a quill, And every man a scribe by trade; To write the love of God above, Would drain the ocean dry Nor could the scroll contain the whole Though stretched from sky to sky

That verse paints such a vivid picture of how we cannot fully understand or appreciate the vast love of God.

But we can certainly try.

And so I have tried to make the habit of taking 5-10 minutes a day to simply reflect on the love of God, and I invite you to join me.

I’ve written some verses below for you to simply read through, To slow down, And simply think about God’s love and care for you.

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"Know therefore that the Lord your God is God, the faithful God who keeps covenant and steadfast love with those who love him and keep his commandments, to a thousand generations.” – Deuteronomy 7:9

"But you, O Lord, are a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness.” – Psalm 86:15

"Give thanks to the God of heaven, for his steadfast love endures forever.” – Psalm 136:26

"The Lord your God is in your midst, a mighty one who will save; he will rejoice over you with gladness; he will quiet you by his love; he will exult over you with loud singing.” – Zephaniah 3:17

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” – John 3:16

"As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Abide in my love. If you keep my commandments, you will abide in my love, just as I have kept my Father’s commandments and abide in his love. These things I have spoken to you, that my joy may be in you, and that your joy may be full. “This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.” – John 15:9–13

“But God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” – Romans 5:8

"No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.” – Romans 8:37–39

"But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved.” – Ephesians 2:4–5

"See what kind of love the Father has given to us, that we should be called children of God; and so we are. The reason why the world does not know us is that it did not know him.” – 1 John 3:1

"I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.” – Galatians 2:20

"In this the love of God was made manifest among us, that God sent his only Son into the world, so that we might live through him. In this is love, not that we have loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins..” – 1 John 4:9–10

"Humble yourselves, therefore, under the mighty hand of God so that at the proper time he may exalt you, casting all your anxieties on him, because he cares for you.” – 1 Peter 5:6–7

"He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds.” – Psalm 147:3

Embracing A Lifestyle Of Confessing Sin And Repentance (Part 2)

Embracing A Lifestyle Of Confessing Sin And Repentance (Part 2)

In case you missed last week’s post, you can read part one at this link: "Embracing A Lifestyle Of Confessing Sin And Repentance”

I never intended for this to be a two-parter, but as I was thinking and praying more about this topic, I realized I left it off improperly.

So let’s back up…

It’s incredible how difficult it is to write on a topic like confessing sin. As I wrote the past blog and now writing this one, I’m constantly pausing to wonder what else I should be confessing or repenting over.

Even worse than that, I have the dread that someone will come to me with something I’m completely unaware of (or worse, that they’ll just hold on to it bitterly while I sit here unaware).

But it was while I thought about these things, I realized I had completely missed one of the most important pieces in my last post.

Encouraging us to actually do it.

The last post pretty much left it as an important thought and something to reflect on, but did you realize that this is something we need to act on right now.

Jesus told us that this is so important that we should even pause our worship to reconcile with those who we have sinned against:

“So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift.” – Matthew 5:23–24

Jesus is basically saying that nothing is more important than your confession of sin and repentance.

Even if you find yourself presenting worship to God He would rather you confess your sin against someone else and reconcile with them And then come back to worship Him.

So, are you going to do it?

Do you have someone in mind that you haven’t confessed sin to and asked forgiveness from?

Now is the time.

Text them. Call them. Meet with them.

Repent of sin, And worship God in His forgiveness.

As we were made to do.

Embracing A Lifestyle Of Confessing Sin And Repentance (Part 1)

Embracing A Lifestyle Of Confessing Sin And Repentance (Part 1)

“Confessing sin” sounds so intense doesn’t it?

It brings up images (for me, at least) of a catholic confessional or your final words with a priest when on death row.

But, it’s not suppose to be so distant in the life of a Christian, is it?

We see confession and repentance as an important act all throughout Scripture. In the Old Testament with the entire sacrificial system and lifestyle ordained by God – and even Jesus Himself confirming this for Christians as His primary message was a call for us to repent of sin and turn to Him for forgiveness (Mark 1:15, Luke 13:5).

(And, note that repentance absolutely confirms confessing sin, as without confession, you have nothing to repent for.)

This is later confirmed in Acts where the primary message of the church to unbelievers is to “repent therefore, and turn back, that your sins may be blotted out.” (Acts 3:19).

All of these examples show that we need to confess and repent of our sins for salvation, but why should we repent of sins after we’re saved?

Repentance as a lifestyle

Ongoing repentance in a Christian’s life is such an important topic that it was the first of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses:

“When our Lord and Master Jesus Christ said, ‘Repent’ (Matthew 4:17), he willed the entire life of believers to be one of repentance.”

As Luther pointed out, scripture points to a daily/frequent repentance – not just a single repentance to become a Christian.

This is alluded to in the sacrificial system laid out in the Old Testament where there were times of “whole covering” sacrifices, but then there were also “trespass” offerings and other types that were done on an “as needed” basis.

Now, as Christians, we do not have a need for a sacrifice to be made beyond what Jesus has already done, His work on the cross as our sacrifice is complete and forever. However, we are told to continue to confess and repent of sin in our lives because, although we have been made righteous before God, we are still imperfect in our actions.

We see this lifestyle as described in James 5:16 where James writes:

“Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person has great power as it is working.” – James 5:16

And also in 1 John 1:9

“If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” – 1 John 1:9

These are not descriptions of repentance for salvation, but for the daily struggles of sin we still have even though we are saved.

So, why is ongoing repentance important?

The obvious question is “why is ongoing repentance important”? If this is not repentance for salvation, then why would God tell us to do this?

I think there are a lot of good reasons for this, but here are the two most important factors I can think of:

1. Confession and repentance keep us focused on the Gospel and the ongoing grace and mercy of Jesus in our lives

Think about it this way: without ongoing repentance, it would be dangerously easy to grow prideful in our salvation. It would be all too easy to think that we have life together and that although the Gospel was something we needed “back then” we don’t need God’s grace for today.

Repentance is the quickest way to bring ourselves back to the reality that we are imperfect, in need of a Savior and that we need God even for our every breath.

And, as a side-note, having a constant reminder of our need for God’s grace is the only surefire way to keep us humble, which is by far the best way for us to live life, since we are told multiple times in scripture that God “Opposes the proud and gives grace to the humble” (Proverbs 29:23, Matthew 23:12, Luke 1:52, James 4:6, 1 Peter 5:5)

2. Confession and repentance bring a constant reminder of who we are and who God is making us to be

Or put another way: when we have an active life of confession and repentance, it helps us recalibrate and realign with God’s will and plan for our life.

Think about it this way: without ongoing repentance, God might never work out the character flaws or other “rough edges” from of your life. Although the Gospel brings about our justification, it is also meant to bring about our sanctification (our becoming more like Jesus).

Paul actually wrote to Titus specifically reminding him that the Gospel was meant to bring about our salvation and to transform us into a people who “renounce ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled, upright, and godly lives in the present age…” (Titus 2:11-14).

God wants us to grow in holiness and Christ-likeness, and this will not happen without the ongoing confession and repentance of sin and shortcomings as God reveals them to us in our lives.

An awesome (and surprising) side benefit of confessing sin and repenting

About a year ago, I remember reading about a study that had been done by the Barna group on what brought about the most evangelistic change in Christians. They were looking to see what could be done in churches today to help the average Christian share the Gospel more frequently in their day to day lives.

And do you know what they found?

It wasn’t how many Bible studies attended
It wasn’t how involved they were in church
Or if they were part of a small group.

The factor that caused the most amount of evangelistic growth in groups of Christians was simply an increase in confessing sin to one another and repenting of their sin.

Isn’t that crazy???

The two seem so unrelated… but are they really?

Because, as we make a purposeful choice to confess sin more frequently…
We are actively choosing to remind ourselves that the Gospel is for us, today…
And as we engage with and are humbled by the Gospel for ourselves
How could we not increase our sharing the Gospel with others?

I think what we so often lack, as Christians, is that we believe the cross, our repentance and the Gospel was for yesterday. It was for “back when I really needed Jesus”.

But when we remember that we need Jesus today.
And we come to Jesus with our sin, today
We will be more humble,
More joyful
More engaged with His mercies
And, of course

We won’t be able to brush by those around us without telling them about this good news that we are experiencing today.

Not yesterday.
Good news, today.

So, may you refresh your hearts in God’s Gospel, grace and mercy, today.

Whether you’ve been saved 1 day, or 100 years, you can enjoy the Good News just as much as you did when you were first saved. And I guarantee you, that when you do, you’ll have a deeper passion and desire to tell others of this great love you’ve found in Jesus.

The Great Gain Of Godliness by Thomas Watson

The Great Gain Of Godliness by Thomas Watson

As I mentioned a few weeks ago, I’ve been listening to a podcast called “Hurry Up And Read” where they read old Christian books aloud on the podcast (that have entered public domain).

As such, here are some quotes and notes from another book I’ve listened to on that podcast. They’re great to meditate on, and if you like them, you can go listen to them too, or read the book, “The Great Gain Of Godliness” by Thomas Watson, yourself.


When others spoke against God, these spoke for God.”

(referring to Malachi 3:16–18)

“To profess religion, when the times favor it, is no great matter. Almost all will court the Gospel Queen when she is hung with jewels, but to own the ways of God when they are decried and maligned, to love a persecuted truth, this evidence is a vital principle of goodness. Dead fish swim down the stream, living fish swim against it. To swim against the common stream of evil shows grace to be alive.”

“Sin is never the better because it is in fashion.”

My note: No matter what everyone else says, we need to follow what God says.


“Lack of the fear of God, is the cause of all innate wickedness.”

“Men do not fear God because they have no knowledge of God.”

(refering to Proverbs 1:29)

“Men do not fear God because they presume on his mercy… but God’s mercy is for those who fear Him: “And his mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation.” – Luke 1:50

“Do you have knowledge, so has Satan
Do you have profession, so has Satan
But do you have filial fear (one of a son or daughter): in this you excel him.
The fear of God is not our plea of heaven, but our evidence of heaven.”

“The majesty of God is seen in the humbling of pride.”

“The fear of God is a Christian’s safety.
He’s invulnerable, nothing can hurt him.
Plunder him of his money, he carries a treasure about him, which he cannot be robbed (Isaiah 33:6).
Cast him into prison, his conscience is free.
Kill his body, he shall rise again.
He who has on this breastplate of God’s fear, may be shot at but can never be shot through.”

“What were the apostate angels damned for? Was it for any more than proud thoughts?”

“I would rather obey than work miracles.” – Martin Luther


“How shall we arrive at this blessed fear? Answer:

1. Let us set God ever in our eye. Study His immensity. He is God, almighty (Genesis 17:1). He gives laws to the angels, binds the consciences of men, cuts off princes. He breaks the spirit of rulers, He is feared by the kings of the earth (Psalm 76:12). The thoughts of God’s incomprehensible greatness should strike a holy awe in our hearts. Elijah wrapped his face in a mantle when God’s glory passed by. The reason men do not fear God is because they entertain slight thoughts of Him. “You thought I was altogether like you” (Psalm 50:21).

2. Let us pray for this fear of God, which is the root of all holiness and the mother of all wisdom. “Give me an undivided heart, that I may fear your name (Psalm 86:11). The Lord has promised to put His fear in our heart (Jeremiah 32:40). Let us pray over this promise. While some pray for riches, and others for children, let us pray for a heart to fear God.”


“His [God’s] ways are secret, but never unjust.”

“Tremble at sinful thoughts. We startle at gross sin, but we do not tremble at sinful thoughts.”

What should the matter of our meditation be?

– Think of God’s immense being
– Think of God’s omnipotence
– Think of God’s holiness
– Think of God’s mercy
– Think of God’s veracity (abundance of truth)


“Though God is sometimes silent – He is not deaf!”

“See the privilege of the godly – they have God’s ear! ’The Lord hearkened and heart!’ ‘His ears are open unto their cry!’ (Psalm 34:15)


“If God records our services, then let us record His mercies. Let us have our book of remembrance. A Christian should keep two books always beside him. One to write his sins in, that he may be humble. The other to write his mercies in, that he may be thankful.”


“A person falling on hard times, and then marring a king, has a share in all the crown revenues.”

“What richer dowery than diety.”

Mothers: Reflecting God’s Image

Mothers: Reflecting God’s Image

Since we celebrated Mother’s Day yesterday, I wanted to add some encouragement to the mothers in my life. And I think this is important because in today’s culture, we tend to either idolize or demonize people and positions – and neither does any good.

We can talk about how incredible and “perfect” mothers are, and unintentionally crush them into guilt as we put more on them than they can live up to.

OR, we talk of the imperfections we’ve seen in mothers or how we have been hurt by mother figures, and that does just as little good for all the mothers we ought to be thankful for.

Ultimately, the approach we should have towards mothers is one of thankfulness for the role they’ve played in our lives, and more importantly, their lives and roles should cause us to look towards God in thankfulness and worship.

So, let’s back up…

God Seen In Every Person And Position

As human beings, we have a very special position before God: we are “made in his image,” or “likeness” (Genesis 1:27).

But, even more than that, God has revealed Himself and His character throughout scripture by giving us comparisons for us to understand Who He is.

A classic example is that God is like a loving Father Who has compassion on His children (Psalm 103:13)…

But that is merely one example. The Bible is filled with comparisons so that we may get an idea of God’s goodness, love, kindness, gentleness and all Who God is by collecting these hundreds of glimpses into a single picture.

Here’s a few more examples to help explain what I mean:

God is described as or compared to a…

Shepherd (Psalm 23)
Warrior (Exodus 15:3)
King (Psalm 29:10)
Potter (Isaiah 29:16)
A friend (James 2:23)
Teacher/Guide (John 16:13)
And many more…

Each of these tells us an aspect of God’s unchanging character and role in our lives.

And one of the most great comparisons is how God is like a mother

God has used parental figures in His Word very frequently, which I’m sure is intentional since we all experience a parental figure in our lives at some point.

Here are just a few examples we see from scripture of how God is like our mothers.

Keep in mind that many of these are specifically God’s relationship to His covenant people, Israel, but we can definitely apply this love and character to God in how He loves and cares for all His people, especially now those who have been added to through His Son, Jesus (Ephesians 2:19, Ephesians 3:6, Romans 11:17-24)

“Yet it was I who taught Ephraim to walk; I took them up by their arms, but they did not know that I healed them. I led them with cords of kindness, with the bands of love, and I became to them as one who eases the yoke on their jaws, and I bent down to them and fed them.” – Hosea 11:3–4

“As one whom his mother comforts, so I will comfort you; you shall be comforted in Jerusalem.” – Isaiah 66:13

“Can a woman forget her nursing child, that she should have no compassion on the son of her womb? Even these may forget, yet I will not forget you.” – Isaiah 49:15

“O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing!” – Matthew 23:37

Mothers have been used many times to remind us of God’s undying love, protection, compassion, care, teaching, leadership and so many more things that most of us have experienced from our own mothers.

And, for these great examples of God’s Character, we ought to be thankful to our mothers…

Unfortunately, We (As Examples Of God) Are Broken And Imperfect

And this is where the problem begins.

We see how God compares Himself to mothers.
And we begin to lift them up to a place they don’t belong.

On a day when we should simply be thankful for our mothers,
Many, even in churches, begin to act as if they’re perfect (or that they ought to be)

And this puts an impossible burden on them.

Or we go the other route.

And maybe we’ve seen poor examples of mothers,
And we begin bashing the hurtful things mothers have done to those we love.

And neither way is good.

Because we were never meant to expect perfection from our mothers.

Like every other person alive,
Mothers represent a piece of God.

They have been made in the image of God
And have the special role of motherhood to exemplify specific traits from God.

But they are not God.

As with every other person alive, their role as an image bearer is to have their lives point to God as the One Who is perfect, Who is complete, Who is lacking nothing.

Just as we have been made as image bearers of God (Genesis 1:27)
Just as every Christian is an ambassador for Christ (2 Corinthians 5:11-21)

Mothers are to point us to God, who is the perfect and complete “mother” we all need.

And as we look at our mothers, we can see their strong points. Their godly characteristics. And know that our God is even more so.

And when we also look at our mothers, and we see their faults. Their imperfections. We are rest assured that our God is not lacking in any way.

And when we look at our mothers this way, we can be thankful for everything they are.

Their strengths, as they help point us to God’s even greater strength.
And their weaknesses and lack, as they also point us to God’s strength and fullness.

There is no need to put them on a pedestal, to put a burden on them that would merely crush them; because it’s a weight they weren’t meant to bear.

Instead, we can enjoy them more fully,
Thanking God for every part of them,
And having their role in our lives bring us even more blessing as it points us to God.

What Does Jesus Say? (And Should I Care?)

What Does Jesus Say? (And Should I Care?)

Yesterday, I got to teach the older kids class at our church as we continued through our study in the book of Mark.

Even better, we were studing the story of The Transfiguration (Mark 9:1–13).

Here’s the basics:

  • Jesus goes up on a mountain with Peter, James and John…
  • And… “He [Jesus] was transfigured before them, and his clothes became radiant, intensely white, as no one on earth could bleach them.” (Mark 9:2–3)
  • And… Then Moses and Elijah are there speaking with him…
  • And… Just as Peter is starting to say they should make tents for them and stay a while with them…

When Suddenly… This Happens:

And a cloud overshadowed them, and a voice came out of the cloud, “This is my beloved Son; listen to him.” And suddenly, looking around, they no longer saw anyone with them but Jesus only.” -Mark 9:7–8

Even for Jesus’ ministry where “the miraculous” was synonymous with “just another Monday” (they were common)… THIS was uncommon.

In all of Jesus’ ministry, there were only two other times where the Father audibly spoke from Heaven. Once at His baptism (Matthew 3:17) and once when Jesus was publicly (John 12:28).

This Is A BIG Deal.

The Father felt it very important, to tell us something.

And what was that?

That Jesus isn’t just another prophet, miracle worker, or man greatly used by God. Jesus is His Son. And we should listen to Him.

Jesus Is God. And When God Says Something, We Should Listen.

Think about it this way:

  • If I called you a liar, it might hurt, but there’s no real consequence…
  • But if your boss calls you a liar, there could be consequences…
  • And if a judge calls you a liar, there will be even greater consequences…

Basically: the level of authority someone has over you, the greater their words matter.

Sometimes, we give someone authority over us by simply valuing them and caring what they say. Other times, their authority over us is given to them by someone else (such as your direct boss being given authority by the company you work for).

So, where does God fall into this?

Well…

  • He created us (Genesis 1:1)
  • Everything we are, have and see is His (Job 41:11, 1 Corinthians 10:26)
  • He is the final Judge of our entire existence (Ezekiel 18:4, Luke 12:20, James 4:12)

God’s Words Matter… A Lot.

And, if they matter so much…

Then what does He say?

The God Who spoke the universe into being…
Has said things to you in His Word.
Have you been listening?

We are told many things each and every day,
Some of them are truth,
Others are not.

And we would do good to follow Paul’s instructions:

“Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.” -Romans 12:2

Renewing Our Minds

The idea of “renewing our minds” is simply this:

Correcting the lies with truth.

So, as we did in the kid’s class yesterday, I encourage you to write down everything you’re told, and more importantly, what you believe. The good, the bad, the truth, the lies and everything in-between. A few examples might be:

  • “You need “X” to be successful or happy”
  • “This life is all there is, so make the most of it”
  • “What’s most important is the experiences you have and people you meet”
  • “If you try hard enough, you can accomplish anything”
  • “Your life is what you make of it”
  • “What goes around, comes around”

Write a list of the thoughts, words, ideas and beliefs you hold most closely…

And see what Jesus has to say about them.

Does He confirm them?
Or deny them?

Because, as we’ve already alluded to…

What He Says Is All That Matters

To help you get started, here’s a list of some of the things God/Jesus says about some of the most important things we experience in life. May you take them to heart and be encouraged, corrected and renewed as you seek what God says about life.

  • Jesus wants you to do good to those who are unkind to you

1 Peter 3:9 “Do not repay evil for evil or reviling for reviling, but on the contrary, bless, for to this you were called, that you may obtain a blessing.”

  • Jesus wants us to do our best to be at peace with others

Romans 12:18 “If possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all.”

  • Jesus wants us to be encouraging to others

1 Thessalonians 5:11 “Therefore encourage one another and build one another up, just as you are doing.”

  • Jesus doesn’t want us to gossip

Ephesians 4:29 “Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear.”

  • Jesus wants us to love God with all of our lives

Matthew 22:37–38 “And he said to him, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the great and first commandment.”

  • Jesus wants us to love others as ourselves

Matthew 22:39 “And a second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

  • Jesus wants us to live holy lives that obey Him

1 Thessalonians 4:3a “For this is the will of God, your sanctification”

  • Jesus won’t give up on us

Philippians 1:6 “And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ.”

  • Jesus has prepared good things for us to do

Ephesians 2:10 “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.”

  • Jesus wants us to have faith in Him

Hebrews 11:6 “And without faith it is impossible to please him, for whoever would draw near to God must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who seek him.”

  • Jesus can help us do good, AND He can help us want to do good

Philippians 2:13 “For it is God who works in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure.”

  • Jesus wants us to not be anxious

Matthew 6:25 “Therefore I tell you, do not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing?

  • We can go to Jesus for comfort

2 Corinthians 1:3–5 “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction, so that we may be able to comfort those who are in any affliction, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God. For as we share abundantly in Christ’s sufferings, so through Christ we share abundantly in comfort too.”

  • We can go to Jesus for wisdom

James 1:5 “If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without reproach, and it will be given him.”

  • We can go to Jesus for help

2 Corinthians 12:9 “But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me.”

  • Jesus is working all things for your good, and you have purpose

Romans 8:28 “And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose.”

  • Jesus has a plan for your life

Jeremiah 29:11 “For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.”

  • Jesus opposes the prideful and gives grace to the humble

James 4:6 “But he gives more grace. Therefore it says, “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble.”

  • Jesus has given you the ability to do everything He has told you to do… today

2 Corinthians 9:8 “And God is able to make all grace abound to you, so that having all sufficiency in all things at all times, you may abound in every good work.”

  • Jesus empowers you to overcome any temptation

1 Corinthians 10:13 “No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.”

  • Jesus is with you through all of life

Isaiah 41:10 “Fear not, for I am with you; be not dismayed, for I am your God; I will strengthen you, I will help you, I will uphold you with my righteous right hand.”

Isaiah 41:13 “For I, the Lord your God, hold your right hand; it is I who say to you, “Fear not, I am the one who helps you.”

  • Jesus will make all things right (He will get revenge)

Romans 12:19 “Beloved, never avenge yourselves, but leave it to the wrath of God, for it is written, “Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord.”

  • You can go to Jesus with your problems

1 Peter 5:7 “Casting all your anxieties on him, because he cares for you.”

  • Jesus can give you peace

John 14:27 “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your hearts be troubled, neither let them be afraid.”

  • Northing can separate you from Jesus’ love

Romans 8:38–39 “For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

  • Jesus wants you to obey your parents

Ephesians 6:1 “Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right.”

  • You are valued by Jesus

1 Peter 1:18–19 “Knowing that you were ransomed from the futile ways inherited from your forefathers, not with perishable things such as silver or gold, but with the precious blood of Christ, like that of a lamb without blemish or spot.”

  • Our hearts are deceitful and wicked

Jeremiah 17:9 “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick; who can understand it?”

  • Jesus wants you to trust in Him, not in yourself

Jeremiah 17:5,7 “Cursed is the man who trusts in man… Blessed is the man who trusts in the LORD.”

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